The key to succeeding with your online business

While Etsy is fantastic for handmade goods that you’ve already created, if you’ve got killer designs that would look good on phone cases, t-shirts, or even wall hangings, pillows, and duvets, you can sell them on Society6 without paying anything to start. Society6 lets artists upload their designs and create their own shops where they choose what products their designs can be used on. That means one design can be used to make a whole range of awesome products that are printed and shipped on demand whenever someone buys from you. With top creators making thousands every month just from selling their designs.
It’s possible to set up a website yourself, but unless you’re a designer or Web developer, you can expect a pretty steep learning curve. If you have the budget, consider hiring a professional to help you with some or all of the following: configuring the site to look the way you want and include the features you need; creating and inserting a logo; optimizing the site for search engines; and creating text and images. For more information, read this guide by Foundr with a detailed explanation of what it takes to setup website and develop it.
Get ecommerce software. You'll need this so your customers can view your products, enter their information and make a secure purchase. The software safely stores customer information. Don't skimp in this area, since the ecommerce software you choose will make a big difference in how easy it is for customers to feel secure buying something from your store.

Take good pictures. Some of the options below don’t require you to actually take the picture and sell the product, but for the ones that do, make sure you take a clear picture that makes your product stand out from the others.  If you’re going to be taking a lot of pictures, set up a small “studio-like” area in your home with a backdrop and proper lighting to really make your pictures come across as professional. And of course, you’ll want a good camera too.

Not only will this multiply the money you’re bringing in in a serious way, but it protects you against any sudden changes in the market or in your business. Remember that old saying about putting all your eggs in one basket? A few hours a week committed to just one or two of the following opportunities will put you in a much stronger position to be financially safe and independent.


A service like Paribus or Earny will help you collect refunds you’re owed from stores. This is a great way to potentially put some extra earnings on autopilot because you’re using an innovative tool to get a refund you deserve. When you make an on-line purchase at a Paribus monitored store. Paribus engages with the retailer on your behalf and files a claim requesting a refund.
Another great option is Acorns and my experience is that Acorns can make anyone an investor. It helps you start saving by rounding up your purchases on the debit or credit card of your choice. Then, every time you hit $5 in savings, Acorns invests your money in ETFs. Mighty convenient. Acorns cost $1, $2, or $3 per month depending on the plan you choose – making it a cheap option for young investors. Here’s our review of Acorns.

Need help deciding which business structure is right for you? Try our handy business structure comparison chart. LegalZoom’s business formation services include filing your paperwork with the state, obtaining your EIN from the IRS, and connecting you with independent lawyers and tax professionals through our business legal plan to answer any questions you might have.


Let’s say I’m an Amazon affiliate for camping gear, and I want to write an exhaustive, in-depth blog post and review of the “50 Best Hiking Backpacks for Adventuring Outdoors.” By running a quick Keyword Planner check on the organic search volume I can see that there’s around 5,500 monthly searches for the keyword ‘hiking backpacks’ alone. I'll then start with putting together a blog post outline to highlight my unique angle and make sure I'm doing the best possible job of answering reader questions.
But it’s also easier for consumers to compare similar products, which makes your ability to differentiate yourself more important. For instance, if you decide to use Etsy to sell handcrafted cutting boards, when a potential customer searches for cutting boards on the site, they’ll wade through potentially hundreds or thousands of relatively similar listings.
Waiting tables and bartending are good ways to make extra money, but it’s not exactly if the work was easy. And if you don’t have any experience good luck applying at the nicest place in town, most restaurants require experience. Also if you have problems dealing with demanding, hungry people – STAY AWAY! The hours are late, sometimes you won’t make any money. Especially right now, starting at new place will be difficult, if you can get hired expect to be the first one cut every night (aka less money) as those with seniority will want to stay. It still is a good deal though. I’ve put myself through college (chem major) without loans, never lived in the dorms, and I have about 10K in the bank. I will continue working in the restaurant biz even after I have a “Real Job,” the extra 10-15K/year for part time work is worth it.

 @dasjung Well the creative industry needs to get over it then. Makes them sound like a bunch of cry babies trying to make the world stop revolving. Everything is a scheme to make extra money. Including the work by the most serious, professional web designer.  Every type of work has different levels of professionalism, and thank goodness we live in the U.S. where people are free to trade goods and services at the levels they deem appropriate. Free enterprise and liberty are beautiful words. I’m all for standards. I’m a CPA. But I’d never tell someone not to help people with taxes as a little side business. And that’s federal taxes! This is logo design. Logo design!My latest conversation: https://ptmoney.com/taking-time-off-work/
DAY IN THE LIFE OF AN ONLINE BUSINESS OWNER | Natalie Barbu's Vlog
DAY IN THE LIFE OF AN ONLINE BUSINESS OWNER | Natalie Barbu's Vlog
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